What's in Season: July in Georgia

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Midsummer in Georgia marks delicate transition between the shy colors of May's crops and the rich harvest of late summer. We're past the summer solstice; the days are full of heat and light and get shorter in slivers. The cicada hum is the soundtrack in the peach fields at dusk. Watermelons spill sticky-sweet on thousands of poolsides. Cucumbers and tomatoes are companions in salads, sandwiches, and cocktails sweating in the shade. Everything being plucked and pulled from the earth is full of water, full of sugar and full of—dare we say it—life.

Feel the sun as you rip the husk and silk to reveal the gold of corn kernels, let the juice of the peach coat your warm skin, admire the strange spires of yellow squash on its deep green vine. Peak summer is about color, about ripeness to the point of bursting, about warmth we hope to carry into fall and winter.

Fruits

Blueberries
Cantaloupes
Cucumber
Eggplant/Aubergines
Figs
Grapes
Peaches
Plums & Pluots
Summer Squash
Tomatoes
Watermelon

Vegetables & Herbs

Basil
Beans
Corn
Garlic
Mushrooms
Okra
Onions
Field Peas
Peppers
Potatoes
Soybeans

Written by Frederic Levesque
Photographed by Paige French

What's in Season: June in Georgia

As the first day of summer fast approaches, our gardens are heavy with ripe produce. Prepare for a month of bountiful markets with our seasonality guide.

Fruit

Blueberries
Cantaloupes
Cucumbers
Peaches
Tomatoes
Watermelon

Enjoy the essence of early summer year round with our Peach Butter. And while they’re both ripe, try out our Gluten-Free Tomato Strawberry Pie.

Vegetables

Arugula
Asparagus
Basil
Beans
Beets
Bok Choy
Broccoli
Collards
Corn
Edamame
Eggplant
Field Peas
Garlic
Lettuce
Mushrooms
Okra
Peppers
Plums
Potatoes
Radishes
Summer Squash
Vidalia Onions

Match the summer heat with our Trinidadian Pepper Pot.

Written by Jodi Cash

Photographed by Paige French


What's in Season: May in Georgia

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May in Georgia means seeing the world through a thick pollen haze, but the warm weather bounty is worth the antagonism of allergies. Traverse mulberry-stained sidewalks to collect what’s growing, and enjoy the brief days before summer’s heat seeps in.

Farmers markets back in full glory throughout the state, now is the time to consult your local farmer about their seasonal harvests.

Fruit

Blueberries
Mulberries
Peaches
Plums
Strawberries
Serviceberries
Tomatoes

Cool off from a hot May day with our Blueberry-Sherry Vinegar Shrub.

Vegetables

Arugula
Asparagus
Basil
Beans
Beets
Bok Choy
Broccoli
Cabbage
Carrots
Collards
English Peas
Field Peas
Garlic
Green Garlic
Kale & greens
Lettuce
Mushrooms
Okra
Potatoes
Radishes
Seedlings
Spinach
Summer Squash
Vidalia Onions

In the last month for carrots and the first for okra, try slow cooking them together.

What's in Season: April in Georgia

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This is a bountiful moment in a shoulder season. As the weather waivers between cold and hot, staple winter crops remain and favorite summertime foods appear.  But it’s worth appreciating spring for its own distinctive merit — a time when the natural world comes alive again, marked by the chirp of baby birds and flowers in first bloom. It’s fitting that this prolific season can be celebrated with a myriad of produce.

This list includes foods in season in the southeastern region. We are big advocates for eating locally (and this is the time — farmers markets are back in full swing!), but mindful shoppers can also feel at ease when purchasing foods that are at least regional. When in doubt, phone a farmer.

Fruit

Cucumbers
Strawberries
Tomatoes

Captivate the beginning of strawberry and tomato season with our Gluten Free Tomato-Strawberry Pie. We’re not being hyperbolic when we say it might just change your life.

Vegetables

Arugula
Asparagus
Beets
Bok Choy
Cabbage
Carrots
Chard
Chicory
Chives
Cilantro
Collards
Endive
Fava beans
Green garlic
Kale
Leeks
Lemongrass
Lettuce
Mint
Morels
Mushrooms
Onions
Oregano
Parsley
Peas
Pea Shoots
Radicchio
Radishes
Rosemary
Sage
Seedlings
Soybean
Spinach
Sweet Potatoes
Tarragon
Thyme
Tomatillos
Turnips
Watercress
Yams
Zucchini

While carrots are still around, try our Carrot Hummus with Gochujang and Hemp Oil.

Story by Jodi Cash
Photo by Paige French


What's in Season: March in Georgia

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For those of us in the Southeastern U.S., March can be a fickle month. When the first day of spring rolls around on the 20th, there’s little telling whether it will be balmy or snow-laden, and often it varies throughout the region. Just before true spring crops are ready for harvest, this month you can count on hearty winter produce to remain in strong supply. And as farmers markets open back up, it's well-advised to simply check with your local growers about the best things to eat this month. (Remember that this is a month, straddling two seasons, in which there are especially drastic differences between what’s growing in Florida versus what can be found in Virginia, etc. ) 

Fruit

Apples
Bananas
Citrus
Cucumbers
Ground cherries
Melons
Strawberries

For an exotic take on a favorite snack, try our Carrot Hummus with Gochujang and Hemp Oil.

Vegetables

Arugula
Asparagus
Basil
Beets
Bok Choy
Broccoli
Brussels Sprouts
Cabbage
Cauliflower
Carrots
Celery
Celery root
Chard
Chicories
Chili peppers
Chives
Cilantro
Collards
Corn
Endive
Eggplant
Fava beans
Fennel
Garlic scapes
Green onions
Horseradish
Jicama
Kale
Kohlrabi
Lamb’s Quarters
Leeks
Lemongrass
Lettuce
Mint
Morels
Mushrooms
Mustard greens
Nettles
Onions
Oregano
Parsley
Peanuts
Peas
Pea Shoots
Purslane
Radicchio
Radishes
Rapini
Rosemary
Sage
Shallots
Snap peas
Snow peas
Sorrel
Spinach
Sprouts
Squash
Sweet Potatoes
Taro
Tarragon
Thyme
Tomatoes
Tomatillos
Turnips
Yams
Zucchini


What's in Season: February in Georgia

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February marks a turning point in the winter. The dreariest, shortest days fall farther behind with Christmas and winter solstice. But, it's still cold, gray and the crowns of trees are completely transparent. And yet, the earth still provides us with a unique variety of fruits and vegetables. Trucks of citrus stream out of Florida and Texas like milk from a nursing cow. Greens, true winter greens, are widely available. The roots of many of those greens are colorful compliments to any meal. Don't make the mistake of wallowing in self-pity as you dream about the soft fruits and berries that will be available as soon as late-March. Pick up a piece of produce at the store and consult the sticker to find out where it is from. If no sticker is visible, use the encyclopedia in your pocket to determine if that eggplant is in season ("Not yet, put it down"). Most importantly, continue to enjoy the many vegetables widely available in the Southeast in February, and remember to feast on the flood of citrus from Florida to spare it from rotting on the ground.

Fruits
Clementines
Grapefruits
Lemons
Limes
Oranges

Lighten up the last of the year's dark winter days with our quick, simple Roasted Cauliflower Salad

Vegetables
Bok Choy
Broccoli
Brussel Sprouts
Cabbage
Carrots
Cauliflower
Celery
Collards
Green Onions
Kale
Lettuce
Mushrooms
English Peas
Sweet Potatoes
Radish
Spinach
Turnips

Story by Gresham Cash
Photo by Paige French


What's in Season: January in Georgia

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If you’re anything like us, perhaps this New Year brought a resolution of eating both seasonally and locally. It’s not always easy, particularly in the winter months when so many of our favorite foods aren’t being grown in the Southeastern region. Nonetheless, it’s a worthwhile effort, and with a little planning and creativity, you can make the foods that January has to offer go a long way. As always, what’s available varies from state to state and even changes within the scope of a month.

Fruits
Grapefruit
Lemons
Limes
Oranges

An exceedingly cold winter in the South calls for soups, stews and other warming meals — we recommend our Winter’s Bounty Stew.

Vegetables
Arugula
Bok Choy
Brussel Sprouts
Cabbage
Carrots
Celery
Chard
Collards
Kale
Leeks
Lettuce
Mushrooms
Peanuts
Radish
Sweet Potatoes
Spinach
Turnips

What's in Season: December in Georgia

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In days of old, oranges and grapefruits were exchanged as Christmas presents or hallowed as the centerpiece of a grand holiday meal. The bright, seasonal fruits were common stocking-stuffers, treasured for their sweetness and vibrant colors — so naturally flavorful that they were worth craving all year long. This holiday season, ask Santa for the gifts of nature's bounty and trade the candy cane for your favorite citrus fruit.  

Fruits 
Grapefruit
Lemon
Lime
Oranges (Valencia and Temple)
Persimmons

Despite the holiday season's call to eat all things decadent and sweet, December remains an excellent time of year for leafy greens and root vegetables. We offer our Turmeric Turnips with Spinach Chimichurri as an exotic reminder that a well-seasoned vegetable is as good a treat as any. Plus, you'll redeem yourself for the extra holiday temptations to which we all inevitably succumb.

Vegetables 
Arugula
Beets
Bok Choy
Broccoli
Brussel Sprouts
Cabbage
Carrots
Collard Greens
Greens
Kale
Lettuce
Mushrooms
Peanuts
Pecans
Spinach
Sweet Potatoes
Radish
Tomatoes
Turnips
Winter Squash

Words by Jodi Cash
Photo by Paige French

What's in Season: November in Georgia

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Ready or not, the holiday season is upon us. Thus begins the time for Thanksgiving meal planning, and of course, we recommend you orient your menu around foods that are locally grown and in-season. This list reflects a general guide of what can be found in the Southeast, although it varies. On your next trip to the farmers market, ask what your local growers will be serving at their own Thanksgiving feasts. 

Fruits 
Apples
Cucumbers
Grapefruit
Oranges (Valencia and Temple)
Persimmons

By little coincidence, we tend to drink our fruits rather than eat them as the weather grows colder. With this month's bounty of grapefruit, try this recipe for Clarified Milk Punch by Michael Clancy at The National in Athens, GA. 

Vegetables 
Arugula
Beets
Bok Choy
Broccoli
Brussel Sprouts
Cabbage
Carrots
Cauliflower
Collard Greens
Field Peas
Greens
Kale
Lettuce
Mushrooms
Peanuts
Pecans
Spinach
Sweet Potatoes
Radish
Tomatoes
Turnips
Winter Squash

Looking for a decadent dish to win Thanksgiving this year? This Butternut Squash Risotto is a guaranteed hit. 

Words by Jodi Cash
Photo by Paige French


What's in Season: October in Georgia

photograph courtesy of    Rinne Allen

photograph courtesy of Rinne Allen

Autumn is upon us. This shoulder season brings about some of our favorite flavors of the year: baked goods made with warm spices, gourds that flourish in all shapes and colors and slow-cooked stews and soups. This guide is meant to inform your seasonal shopping and meal planning pursuits, though the best way to determine what you should eat this month is to check out your local farmers market to see what they’re selling. 

Fruits:

Apples
Cucumbers
Grapes
Pears

The crisp air of October calls for a change not only to the way we’re eating, but also to the way we’re drinking. In the height of apple harvests, enjoy the Old Man Smith, a seasonal take on the classic Old Fashioned.  

Vegetables:

Arugula
Beans
Beets
Bok choy
Broccoli
Cabbage
Carrots
Collard greens
Eggplant
Greens
Herbs
Kale
Lettuce
Mushrooms
Okra
Peanuts
Peas
Peppers
Persimmons
Pumpkins
Radishes
Summer squash
Sweet potatoes
Tomatoes
Tomatillos
Turnips
Winter squash
Zucchini

This is also the season to begin preparing food more slowly and thoughtfully, as in our recipe for Slow-Cooked Okra, Fennel and Carrots. And if you’re looking to reinvent a roasted vegetable dish this month, try our Turmeric Turnips with Spinach Chimichurri.

Words by Jodi Cash

Photo by Rinne Allen

What's in Season: September in Georgia

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Here we are at the turning point of summer to fall, a time when fields are still verdant and bountiful but cooler winds begin to blow. The temperatures in September are particularly unpredictable, so as always, it’s best to go straight to the source and ask your local farmers what’s still growing in their gardens. This guide is meant to help you plan seasonal meals this month, and we highly recommend finding sustainable sources in your area for September’s fruit and vegetable offerings. (Naturally, what’s in season will also vary state to state.)

Fruits:

Apples
Cucumbers
Figs
Grapes
Ground Cherries
Peaches
Pears
Persimmons
Raspberries
Tomatillos
Tomatoes
Watermelons
Valencia Oranges

Peaches are on the last threshold of freshness in South Carolina, so be sure to preserve them while you can using our Peach Butter recipe. And while the warm days continue, cool off with our The 5 & 10’s recipe for Scuppernong Sorbet, one of our very favorite frozen treats. 

Vegetables and legumes:

Beets
Bok Choy
Cabbage
Collard Greens
Edamame
Eggplant
Chili Peppers
Chives
Garlic
Green Beans
Greens
Green Onions
Herbs
Kale
Lettuce
Leeks
Lima Beans
Mushrooms
Okra
Onions
Peanuts
Peas
Pecans
Peppers
Pole Beans
Potatoes
Pumpkins
Radishes
Shell Beans
Spinach
Sprouts
Summer Squash
Sweet Potatoes
Turnips
Winter Squash
Yams
Zucchini

With football season in full swing, there’s no better time to whip up our recipe for Classic Boiled Peanuts and win the favor of your tailgating friends. Our Heirloom Squash Pie is also sure to please for those who would rather enjoy vegetables as a dessert. 


What's in Season: August in Georgia

Foraging for wild grapes just might be our favorite edible activity this season.

Foraging for wild grapes just might be our favorite edible activity this season.

Although the precise seasonality of crops varies throughout the state month-to-month (and of course, it’s contingent on the weather, which is only more erratic all the time), this is a general guide to help you seek out the right stuff at your local markets. Don’t let this stop you from exploring other options offered by your farmers—when it comes to seasonality, they know best!

Fruits:

Apples
Apricots
Blueberries
Cantaloupes
Cucumbers
Figs
Grapes
Nectarines
Peaches
Tomatoes
Watermelons

Try those abundant blueberries in our Blueberry-Sherry Vinegar Shrub. This Muscadine Spritz is another of our favorite ways to beat the heat this month. 

Vegetables:

Butter beans
Cabbage
Corn
Eggplant
Field peas
Green beans
Herbs
Okra
Peanuts
Peppers
Pole beans
Summer squash
Sweet potatoes
Zucchini
Zucchini blossoms


Summer squash steals the show in this Stuffed Summer Squash with Kielbasa Pork. We also love to feast on okra and peppers in this Trinidadian Pepper Pot

Words by Jodi Cash

Photograph by Paige French

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